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Changing The World, Together.

Landscape / Ilumination / HVAC

Course

Landscape Designing

Overview

Landscape design is an independent profession and a design and art tradition which is practiced by landscape designers. It is an amalgamation of nature and culture. In recent practice, landscape design bridges the gap between landscape architecture and garden design.[

Landscape design focuses on the integrated master landscape planning of a property. It also lays stress on the specific garden design of landscape elements and plants within it. The practical, aesthetic, horticultural, and environmental sustainability are different aspects of landscape design. Landscape designers often collaborate with related disciplines such as architecture and geography, soils and civil engineering, surveying, landscape contracting, botany, and artisan specialties. Design projects involve two different professional roles: landscape design and landscape architecture.

Landscape design involves artistic composition, artisanship, horticultural finesse and expertise. It also gives emphasis on detailed site involvement from conceptual stages through to final construction. Landscape architecture focuses more on urban planning, city and regional parks, civic and corporate landscapes.

There can be significant overlap of talent and skill between the two roles, depending on the education, licensing, and experience of the professional. Both landscape designers and landscape architects practice landscape design.



What You Learn

EXINIANS are trained about the following-

Theory of Horticulture:

  • Plant Morphology, General Theory, Plant Growth Cycle, Method of Regeneration.
  • Herbarium, Collection Of Specimen and Study Of Trees, Shrubs, Climbers, Ground covers.
  • Cultivation Technique and Soil Manure
  • Specialized Technique in Gardening, Indoor and Basket Gardening, Bonsai, Green Houses

Theory of Design:

  • Elements of Landscape Design like Topography, Water, Light, Shade, Wind and Street light.
  • History of Landscape Design,Japanese, Modern Landscape Design.
  • Basic Design, Color Theory, Collage, Sketching.
  • Drawing and Presentation, Scale Drawing & Model Making, Measured Drawings, Presentation Techniques, Working Drawing, Plantation Drawing.
  • General Site Visits, Market Surveys

How You Learn

Topics Covered in this Landscape Design Class Include:

  • Introduction to the landscape design process
  • Fundamentals and elements of landscape design
  • Introduction to design graphics
  • Functional and spatial diagrams
  • Preparing base maps and bubble diagrams
  • Site analysis and constraints
  • Contours and land forms
  • Plant massing and design composition
  • Vehicular and pedestrian needs / Mechanics of driveways and walks
  • Decks, pools and gathering areas
  • Walls, rain gardens, and water features
  • Landscaping for corner lots

Skills You Learn

Several landscape design projects are incorporated into the curriculum, each one builds upon previous coursework and gains in complexity. In addition to learning the theory and principles behind picture-perfect landscape designs, one will also get practical experience. One will gain knowledge on how to complete assignments such as developing a base map, preparing a site analysis overlay and creating a front yard landscape plan. EXINIANS are taught how to design a residential courtyard landscape, plan a backyard entertainment area with deck and patio and develop a landscape plan for a corner lot.

These projects will provide the students of EXIN with the chance to apply new knowledge of landscape design concepts and practice using all of the design skills that one has gained during the course. One will also get feedback from the instructor and classmates to help one improve the design concepts so that one can feel confident while presenting to future clients. Weekly design assignments will culminate in a final project in which one will get the opportunity to create a residential landscape plan.

Career Opportunities

  • Landscape Designers
  • Landscape Business Owners
  • Landscape Contractors
  • Landscape Foremen
  • Groundskeepers
  • Garden Center and Nursery Managers
  • Master Gardeners
  • Homeowners

Duration of the Course: 6 months

Application Process

Eligibility

Interested candidates must have appeared/passed the CBSE/ISCE/ISC/Regional Board (or any other equivalent board) 10+2 examination in any discipline. Candidates who have recently appeared for the examination and are awaiting their results may also apply.

Method

We, at EXIN follow the following evaluation procedures for admission to its various courses. Candidates have to undergo:

The admission procedure to various courses at EXIN follows the method of:

 

1. An admission test.

2. An all-inclusive interview.


Illumination

Overview

Interior lighting is something which directly and indirectly affects your design ideas and provides you with balanced designing if used and utilized properly. Not only natural lighting but also artificial lighting or illumination plays a vital role to change the effects of design and decors in a dramatic and practical manner. Illuminate the rooms, spaces, place in such a manner that it gives a pleasure to be in. There are so many light fixtures to be used to get the desired amount of illumination for your interiors. Interior lighting not only provides light to work and need but it also adds on the visual effects to decors and design of the place accordingly.

Rooms should be well illuminated to accommodate the user’s needs. Always keep in mind to give good space and placement to all the lighting fixtures like ambient light, accent light, task light, chandeliers, spot light, halogens , fluorescent, incandescent, tungsten, aesthetic light fixtures etc. These lights are divided into two categories; one is to create aesthetic illumination to bring more of the dramatic and impressive visual effects and secondly for the general illumination requirements in each and every room, corner and space of the interiors and exteriors.

For general and good lighting one must use and place fluorescent, incandescent, halogen or CFL. Other kind of lights fixtures are basically used to get the aesthetic feel and give your room designs, ceiling designs, floor designs and stair designs a complete effect and visual impressions. A balancing act is important in all rooms when it comes to bring together the discipline of general illumination and aesthetic illumination. An evenly lit room will become boring rather quickly. It will also tend to fatigue the user, particularly if repetitious tasks are being performed. Some of the up lights, down lights and wall washer’s work well together. They make a good team in almost any room and if dimmers are added they can perform well in any atmosphere.

How You Learn

The following modules are included in this course:-

Photometry and Colorimetry

Measurements of light based only on physical properties are of limited use to the lighting designer. Instead, the tools to measure and communicate the characteristics of light sources and illumination consider the impact of the physical attributes of light on the human visual system. This unit covers the photometric measures related to the quantity of light and illumination and the colorimetric systems used to characterize the colour of lights and objects. The calculation methods underlying these measures are included, with an emphasis on useful simulation techniques. The derivations, meanings, proper applications, and limitations of these measurements systems are discussed. An overview of physical instruments for photometric and colorimetric measurements is included. Students learn to apply knowledge of photometry and colorimetry to evaluate lighting products.

Light and Vision

In lighting design, the primary function of light is to facilitate visual perception of the illuminated scene. User-centered lighting design requires a thorough understanding of the biological link between light and vision. In this unit, students learn the fundamentals of the human visual system and the physical properties of light that impact perception. Specific topics includes an overview of visual anatomy, the behaviour of the photoreceptors, and post-receptoral processing that leads to colour perception. The spectral, spatial, and temporal characteristics of visual processing are also covered. Important visual phenomena, such as chromatic adaptation and contrast sensitivity, are discussed. The link between fundamental knowledge of the human visual system and the practical application of lighting design is emphasized.

Introduction to Architectural Science

This unit aims to explore the scientific concepts of heat, light and sound, and from this develops foundational principles and methods applicable to buildings. It is divided into five topics: climate and resources: thermal environment: building services: lighting; and acoustics. Students will gain an understanding of the terminology, physical values and metrics in each of these topics, and how they apply to the design and function of buildings. Theoretical models to predict key physical values in buildings are presented and used in assessments. Learning is supported by measurement exercises. This unit has a focused pedagogy intended for all graduate students in Architectural Science. It is a common core unit for all of the programs (Audio and Acoustics, High Performance Buildings, Illumination Design and Sustainable Design). Students within these programs should undertake this unit in their first semester of study if possible.

Lighting Design Software

Modern lighting design practice requires the use of computer software to create design plans that can be easily modified, shared, and presented to clients. In this unit, students learn the basic operation of popular lighting design software packages, with particular emphasis on AGi32. This unit discusses the advantages and limitations of different calculation models used within lighting software. The fundamentals of rendering, importing and exporting data, selecting calculation modes, interpreting outputs, and complying with lighting design standards are included. Students gain hands-on experience modelling the effects of different lighting technologies within various architectural spaces. The use of lighting design software as a tool in the design process, rather than a replacement for it, is emphasized.

Lighting Technologies

This unit covers the technologies employed in generating, distributing, and controlling light in illuminated environments. Students learn the advantages and disadvantages of different hardware options for various lighting applications. A brief history of lighting technologies and the physical processes involved with electrically generating light are included in this unit. Practical characteristics of currently popular lamp types, as well as emerging lighting technologies, are presented. The effects of integral luminaries and other light fittings on the resulting illumination are covered, as are the electrical requirements of different lighting technologies. This unit also includes calculation techniques for predicting the illumination in spaces from lighting products. The selection, operation, and implications of lighting control options are discussed. The underlying principles and practical consequences of the different characteristics of various lighting technologies are emphasized to enable students to independently evaluate future innovations in lighting technologies.

Subjective Analysis in lighting Design

Lighting to a high aesthetic standard under pre-determined constraints requires an understanding of visual perception, quality of light, form and modeling, human sensitivity to a wide range of lighting environments, and a balanced approach involving critical reasoning and subjective analysis. This unit will be valuable for those interested in the lighting of architectural forms, objects and environments that demand a high level of aesthetic sensitivity. It will not only draw on learning outcomes from other illumination design units, but also be open to related disciplines with the aim of extending acquired skills beyond the confines of traditional lighting practices. Students will gain a broadened ability to interpret and respond to a wide range of illumination applications.

What You Learn

This program offers strong technical education in human visual perception, methods for quantifying light, lighting technologies and sustainability. Using biology and physics, the coursework gives you a deep appreciation of the ways that light shapes the human experience of the built environment. This is complemented by practical curriculum to prepare students for a career in the lighting industry.

Career Opportunities

  • Lighting Designer
  • Lighting Engineer

Duration of the Course: 3 months

Application Process

Eligibility

Interested candidates must have appeared/passed the CBSE/ISCE/ISC/Regional Board (or any other equivalent board) 10+2 examination in any discipline. Candidates who have recently appeared for the examination and are awaiting their results may also apply.

Method

We, at EXIN follow the following evaluation procedures for admission to its various courses. Candidates have to undergo:

The admission procedure to various courses at EXIN follows the method of:

 

1. An admission test.

2. An all-inclusive interview.


HVAC

Overview

Heating, Ventilation and Air-conditioning (HVAC) is the technology of indoor and vehicular environmental comfort. Its goal is to provide thermal comfort and acceptable indoor air quality. HVAC system design is a sub discipline of mechanical engineering, based on the principles of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer. Refrigeration is sometimes added to the field's abbreviation as HVAC&R or HVACR, or ventilating is dropped as in HACR (such as the designation of HACR-rated circuit breakers).

HVAC is an important part of residential structures such as single family homes, apartment buildings, hotels and senior living facilities, medium to large industrial and office buildings such as skyscrapers and hospitals, onboard vessels, and in marine environments, where safe and healthy building conditions are regulated with respect to temperature and humidity, using fresh air from outdoors.

Ventilating or ventilation (the V in HVAC) is the process of exchanging or replacing air in any space to provide high indoor air quality which involves temperature control, oxygen replenishment, and removal of moisture, odors, smoke, heat, dust, airborne bacteria, carbon dioxide, and other gases. Ventilation removes unpleasant smells and excessive moisture, introduces outside air, keeps interior building air circulating, and prevents stagnation of the interior air.

Ventilation includes both the exchange of air to the outside as well as circulation of air within the building. It is one of the most important factors for maintaining acceptable indoor air quality in buildings. Methods for ventilating a building may be divided into mechanical/forced and natural types.

The three central functions of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning are interrelated, especially with the need to provide thermal comfort and acceptable indoor air quality within reasonable installation, operation, and maintenance costs. HVAC systems can be used in both domestic and commercial environments. HVAC systems can provide ventilation, reduce air infiltration, and maintain pressure relationships between spaces. The means of air delivery and removal from spaces is known as room air distribution.

Individual systems

In modern buildings the design, installation, and control systems of these functions are integrated into one or more HVAC systems. For very small buildings, contractors normally estimate the capacity and type of system needed and then design the system, selecting the appropriate refrigerant and various components needed. For larger buildings, building service designers, mechanical engineers, or building services engineers analyze, design, and specify the HVAC systems. Specialty mechanical contractors then fabricate and commission the systems. Building permits and code-compliance inspections of the installations are normally required for all sizes of building.

 

District networks

Although HVAC is executed in individual buildings or other enclosed spaces (like NORAD's underground headquarters), the equipment involved is in some cases an extension of a larger district heating (DH) or district cooling (DC) network, or a combined DHC network. In such cases, the operating and maintenance aspects are simplified and metering becomes necessary to bill for the energy that is consumed, and in some cases energy that is returned to the larger system. For example, at a given time one building may be utilizing chilled water for air conditioning and the warm water it returns may be used in another building for heating, or for the overall heating-portion of the DHC network (likely with energy added to boost the temperature).

Basing HVAC on a larger network helps provide an economy of scale that is often not possible for individual buildings, for utilizing renewable energy sources such as solar heat,[7][8][9] winter's cold,[10] the cooling potential in some places of lakes or seawater for free cooling, and the enabling function of seasonal thermal energy storage.

What One Learns

Below are some of the areas one will study when one enrolls in HVAC training program:-

  • Motors and motor controls
  • Automated HVAC controls
  • HVAC unit maintenance
  • Domestic appliances and cold water air conditioners
  • Basics of electricity
  • HVAC system installation
  • Problem solving of air quality issues
  • Commercial and industrial refrigeration units

How You Learn

Once you have enrolled in HVAC education program at EXIN, one will begin to study many areas. These areas include theory and application of air conditioning and refrigeration, thermodynamic cycles, accessories, devices and refrigerants. One will also cover advanced topics related to commercial units that include installation, heat load calculations, low temperature systems and multiple system installs.

During HVAC classes at EXIN, one will discover the basics of electrical control work and learn skills for using ladder diagrams, test meters, wiring diagrams and thermostats. Our advanced teachings review pneumatic and electronic controls and how to service and maintain both.

On the heating side of things, one will learn the principles of heating technology and appliances, which includes forced-air fuel gas, electrical, oil, combustion processes and heat pumps. Both residential and commercial applications are covered, as well as codes, venting and piping practices, too.

Also included in heating and ventilation training is steam and hot water systems typically used in both residential and commercial installs. This training involves boilers, circulators, pipes, traps, heat exchanges and controls. The basics of fabrication and sheet metal as they apply to HVAC ductwork is also a part of your education.

Skills You Learn

Understanding How Different HVAC Systems Work

Understanding the functionality, technical specifications, and differences between various HVAC heating systems is definitely a key skill students learn in HVAC training. Here’s a look at some of the systems you will study, and their primary attributes:

1) Forced air furnace systems

 The furnace blows heated air through ducts, which deliver the warmth to each room via air registers or grills.

2) Hydraulic boilers

Boilers work by heating water and circulating it throughout a building via warming baseboards, radiators, radiant tubing in floors and/or ceilings, etc. The cooled water returns to the boiler to be re-heated, and the process begins again.

3) Heat pumps

Heat pumps are capable of both heating a structure in the winter and cooling it in the summer. There are two different kinds of heat pumps: air-source (above ground) and ground-source (below ground). Air-source pumps are cheaper, easier to install, and therefore more common. During the summer, an air-source heat pump simply moves heat from the indoor space to outside. In the winter, it moves warm air into the house with the help of an electrical system.  A forced air system circulates the warm air throughout the structure.

These are just three of the residential and light commercial HVAC systems students learn to understand, install, and service in HVAC training programs.

 

2. HVAC Piping & Venting Methods

 

Students in pre-apprenticeship HVAC programs will also learn how to thread and install gas piping systems, in both soft copper and black steel.  They will explore the fundamentals of duct systems, which provide for the controlled flow of air throughout a building. Ducts can be made of fiberglass ductboard, insulated plastic, or sheet metal—so students can expect hands-on training with some or all of these materials.

Another key concept HVAC courses will cover is ventilation, which is a critical factor in controlling temperature and maintaining indoor air quality. Students will learn the differences between, and applications of, different types of ventilation methods, such as:

  • Mechanical or forced ventilation, which is used to prevent excess humidity, odors, and contaminants (examples include a mechanical exhaust in a kitchen or bathroom, or a ceiling fan used to circulate air and regulate temperature)
  • Natural ventilation, which works without the help of mechanical systems or fans, and instead uses windows, louvers, or trickle vents to regulate the indoor environment (air conditioning systems are often used to back-up or supplement natural ventilation systems)

3. HVAC Safety Regulations, Protocols & Practices

One of the most important skills students learn in HVAC courses is safety requirements and procedures.  Training should cover several areas of best practice, including:

  • A comprehensive review of the electrical safety requirements of the Occupational Health and Safety Act (the OHSA is Ontario’s cornerstone legislation for workplace health and safety, and applies to almost every worker, supplier, and employer in the province)
  • Environmental refrigerant laws: because HVAC technicians handle ozone-depleting substances, such as refrigerants, they must undergo ODP (ozone-depletion prevention) training and earn a certificate
  • Legislative requirements and general procedures for working in confined spaces (identifying hazards, rescue requirements, meters and monitors, permits, etc.)
  • Evaluating and preventing risks associated with working at heights.

 

Duration of the Course: 3 months

Application Process

Eligibility

Interested candidates must have appeared/passed the CBSE/ISCE/ISC/Regional Board (or any other equivalent board) 10+2 examination in any discipline. Candidates who have recently appeared for the examination and are awaiting their results may also apply.

Method

We, at EXIN follow the following evaluation procedures for admission to its various courses. Candidates have to undergo:

The admission procedure to various courses at EXIN follows the method of:

 

1. An admission test.

2. An all-inclusive interview.

 

 

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